Staff

Daryl Baldwin

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Daryl Baldwin is a citizen of the Miami Tribe of Oklahoma. He was born and raised around the Great Lakes area and currently resides in Liberty, Indiana with his wife and four children.

Daryl’s forefathers were active in the affairs of the Miami Nation dating back to the 18th century, and he continues this dedication through his work in language and cultural revitalization. Daryl graduated in 1999 from The University of Montana with a Masters in Arts with emphasis in Native American linguistics.

Since 1995, he has worked with the Myaamia people developing culture and language based educational materials and programs for the tribal community. Daryl is currently the Director of the Myaamia Center at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. The Myaamia Center is a joint venture between the Miami Tribe of Oklahoma and Miami University.

Daryl’s full list of publications can be read here.

 

George Ironstrack

George Ironstrack has participated in Myaamia language renewal projects as both a student and a teacher since the mid-1990s.

Originally from Chicago, George, Tamise, and their children Kai, Mirin, and Jordi all make their home in Oxford, OH.

George is a citizen of the Miami Tribe of Oklahoma and has assisted in the organization and administration of the Tribe’s Eewansaapita Summer Educational Experience since its inception in 2005.

George received an M.A. in Origins and History of the United States from the Department of History at Miami University. His graduate work centered on the Miami Indian village of Pickawillany, which was located in western Ohio near the city of Piqua.

George continues to regularly research and write about Myaamia history.  Examples of his work can be found on the Myaamia Community History & Ecology Blog: Aacimotaatiiyankwi.  As both a tribal educator and a former public school teacher, George is also interested in the study of indigenous pedagogical practices and specifically Myaamia Neepwaantiinki (Miami Education).

Curriculum Vitae (PDF)

Andrew J. Strack

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Andrew is a citizen of the Miami Tribe of Oklahoma from Kendallville, IN. He currently lives in Oxford, Ohio. Andrew joined the Myaamia Project as Media Specialist in September 2007 after graduating from Miami University with a bachelor’s degree in Mass Communication. He now directs the Technology and Publications Office of the Myaamia Center.

Andrew was one of the first students to participate in the classes about Miami Tribe history, culture and contemporary issues that are available to Miami Tribe students at Miami University. In his time as an undergraduate, Andrew made several short videos for the Myaamia Project while participating in independent study projects.

The Technology and Publication office is working to increase the reach and effectiveness of Myaamia Center materials using video, photography, and online resources. Recent projects include web based language learning tools, books, educational videos, and maintaining the Center’s online presence.

Andrew’s list of publications can be read here.

 

Dr. David J. Costa

Storybook UnveilingDr. David J. Costa is a contract consultant to the Myaamia Center. He completed his B.A. in linguistics at UCLA in 1985, and his Ph.D. in linguistics at U.C. Berkeley in 1994 with his dissertation on the Miami-Illinois Language. A revised version of his dissertation was published through the University of Nebraska Press in 2003. He has been studying the Miami-Illinois language since 1988, and has worked extensively with the Miami Tribe of Oklahoma on language revitalization since 1995.

Dr. Costa just completed Myaamia neehi peewaalia aacimoona neehi aalhsoohkaana. Myaamia and Peoria Narratives and Winter Stories, a collection of traditional Miami, Wea, and Peoria narratives, published through the Myaamia Project. He is also working on a fully annotated collection of interlinearized Miami-Illinois texts, hopefully to be finished in the next few years. Additionally, he is continuing to add to his ongoing etymological dictionary database of Miami-Illinois.

In addition to his work on Miami-Illinois, Dr. Costa has also done extensive research on the Shawnee language, the Algonquian languages of southern New England, and comparative Algonquian. Dr. Costa is a third-generation northern Californian and lives in El Cerrito, California, with his wife and daughter.

Dr. Costa’s full list of publications can be read here.

Bobbe Burke

Photo Courtesy of Jeff Sabo, Miami Marketing and Communication

Bobbe Burke, a 1970 Miami University graduate, has worked in the Division of Student Affairs at Miami since 1989. Her first assignments with the Miami Tribe were in 1991. In 1994 she became the university’s Coordinator of Miami Tribe Relations. Working closely with both the Vice President for Student Affairs and the Dean of Students, the relationship between Miami University and the Miami Tribe of Oklahoma has developed in an intentional and deliberate manner.  Each activity, project, class, or visit is treated as one piece of a much broader relationship.

In addition to planning trips to Oklahoma and hosting Tribal officials, citizens and guests on visits to campus, Bobbe also helps recruit potential faculty members for deeper involvement with the Tribe. She has been very involved with the more than 80 Myaamia students who have enrolled at Miami University since 1991. She helped spearhead the activities in March 2012 that celebrated 40 years of connection between Miami University and the Miami Tribe, 20 years of Myaamia students at Miami, and 10 years of the Myaamia Project on campus.

Bobbe has recently started a new assignment as Coordinator of Education Special Projects for the Miami Tribe of Oklahoma.  In that capacity, she is integrally involved with an Oklahoma planning team working to advance the development of the newly created Department of Education. Special efforts to engage in strategic planning, moving the project through conceptual to implementation stages, will also include creating and conducting an educational needs assessment of the tribal community. Information about this effort will appear on the Miami Tribe of Oklahoma’s website at www.miamination.com.

 

Elise Brauckmann

Elise is the administrative assistant for the Myaamia Center, as well as an associate of the Technology and Publications Office.  She lives in Oxford, and has worked for the Myaamia Center for two years.